Morning Sleepiness among College Students

Morning Sleepiness among College Students:
Surprising Reasons for Class-Time Preference*
Jane Trex Doe
Learning Time University
Word count = 8,537
MORNING SLEEPINESS AMONG COLLEGE STUDENTS: SURPRISING REASONS FOR CLASS-TIME PREFERENCE
At Learning Time University, courses scheduled earlier than 10:00am are slow to fill up and faculty notice that many students seem less-than enthusiastic to participate in discussions. This study investigated morning sleepiness and class-time preferences using focus groups and surveys administered to 52 undergraduate students in the social sciences. Faculty perceptions were also elicited through informal conversations at department meetings. Results indicate that many students feel overwhelmed with the amount of readings and homework and often stay up late in order to complete assignments.

Keywords: time management, college students, sleep
MORNING SLEEPINESS AMONG COLLEGE STUDENTS: SURPRISING REASONS FOR CLASS-TIME PREFERENCE
This is where you write your introduction! You might want to mention the reason for your investigation, your research questions, some context, and so forth.

LITERATURE REVIEW
You could also choose to put the lit review directly in the introduction. This is just an example of a first-level heading.

METHODS
This is where you talk about your methodology. Feel free to use a more exciting heading.

Focus Groups
This is a second-level heading.

Survey
Another second-level heading.

RESULTS
This is where you talk about your findings. Again, label as you wish.

Student Perceptions
A second-level heading.

Overwhelming work load.

A third-level heading.

Time management.

Another third-level heading.

Faculty Perceptions
A second-level heading.

Frustration with last-minute scheduling.

A third-level heading.

Assumptions about ineffective time-management.

Another third-level heading1.

DISCUSSION
This is where you analyze your results2, tying it back to your scholarly foundation, methodology, and theory.

CONCLUSION
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NOTES
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2 Another endnote. Use sparingly as they can be overwhelming for readers.

REFERENCES
Esherick, Joan. 2004. Dead on their Feet: Teen Sleep Deprivation and its Consequences. Philadelphia: Mason Crest Publishers.

Macan, Therese Hoff. 1990. “College Students’ Time Management: Correlations with Academic Performance and Stress.” Journal of Educational Psychology. 82 (4): 760-68.

APPENDIX A: COURSE SCHEDULING DATA
Demographic information, survey tools, graphs, and other data can go in appendices or within the body of your paper. You decide!
APPENDIX B: SURVEY RESPONSES
Just another example of an appendix.